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Feeding Your Dog Raw Eggs – Good Or Bad?

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There are a lot of myths and misconceptions about raw feeding and it seems the poor egg is often dragged through the mud as a dangerous food for dogs. Opponents of eggs claim that they are too high in cholesterol, they pose a risk of salmonella and that they cause a biotin deficiency. To that, we say nonsense! Eggs are not only a cheap and safe source of raw food for your dog, they are one of the most complete and nutritious meals you can choose!

Here are the facts you need to know about eggs.

Eggs are a complete food source – Eggs are an important source of nutrition for not only many predators, but for the chick living inside it.  Inside the egg are all the nutrients necessary to grow a new chicken.  Eggs are also one of the most complete sources of amino acids, the building blocks of protein.  Eggs are a good source of:

Vitamin A
Riboflavin
Folate
Vitamin B12
Iron
Selenium
Fatty Acids

Egg whites contain enzyme inhibitors – One of the reasons pet owners are warned off eggs is that the whites contain enzyme inhibitors which can interfere with digestion, especially in very young and old animals.  This is true, but it only means that eggs should not be the mainstay of the diet.  It is perfectly safe to feed several eggs a week to the average dog.  If you don’t see evidence of digestive upset when feeding eggs to dogs, then he should have no trouble if eggs are a regular part of his diet.  Cooking the egg white could solve this problem but much of the nutrition would be lost so it is best to feed it raw.

Egg whites cause Biotin deficiency – Egg whites contain avidin, a Biotin (one of the B vitamins) inhibitor.  Biotin is one of the B vitamins and is important for cellular growth, fatty acid metabolism and good skin and coat.  Biotin deficiencies are quite rare and it would take an extraordinary amount of eggs to create a deficiency.  Moreover, egg yolks are very high in biotin, so as long as you feed the entire egg, there are few worries.  There are other sources of biotin in the diet as well.  Liver is a particularly good source.  Once again, cooking the egg white will eliminate the risk but your dog will lose much of the nutritional value.  If feeding your dog eggs on a regular basis, simply make sure he gets the whole egg, not just the white.

Eggs contain salmonella – Dogs are well equipped to handle the bacteria in raw foods.  The health of the hen is also important, so it is best to choose eggs from organic, free-range chickens.  Proper storage and keeping the eggs cool will also go a long way toward keeping the harmful bacteria at a manageable level.

Don’t forget the shells – If eggs are fed with the shell on, they are a nearly complete food source for dogs.  The shells can also be valuable for dogs who have difficulty eating bones.  Simply dry the shells out and grind them in a clean coffee grinder until they are powdered and sprinkle the powder on your dog’s food.  It’s important to remember that many eggs are sprayed with a chemical to make them look shiny, so it is best to get your eggs from a local organic farmer.

Eggs are cheap, easily obtained and an outstanding source of nutrition for your dog.  The overall concensus with raw feeders is that the health benefits of eggs certainly outweigh the risks – and feeding eggs whole, the way nature intended, goes a long ways to counteract harmful imbalances.  Try feeding your dogs a few eggs a week and he will you’ll see better health, inside and out.

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90 Responses to Feeding Your Dog Raw Eggs – Good Or Bad?

  1. Daniel Campos

    My dog caught parvo and has been loosing weight . Noble is not eating only drinking water. I have been forcing him to eat 2 raw eggs a day and I give him pinnesillen. While in the mean waiting for the dog clinic to open. Are the eggs helping him?!

  2. Rose Thorne

    I have a rescued ‘deer’ Chihuahua (possible mix, but she was turned in by owner who claimed pure for what it matters – her kisses are the same either way) roughly about 2-1/2 years old, 10 lbs, smooth coat with (permanently shedding) undercoat so more fuzzy than smooth coat without it.

    I gave her a raw egg over her dry food and she gobbled it down, only to throw up, once, a couple hours later. She does however tolerate the bits of slow roiled egg (not boiled though it does result in a cooked egg), that I gave her more recently. My questions are, while I realize cooking cuts into the listed benefits, is there enough to make it worth continuing? And does eggs cooked by heating to short of boiling, then removed from heat to slowly cook as cooling make a difference?

    I am looking for prettier coat, anything besides her brushing to help with shedding, and how much (cooked) egg should a Chihuahua have in a day, in a week?

    Thanks

    • Rose, raw eggs will definitely have more nutritional benefits so you might want to try again with the raw but giving her a smaller amount. You could beat the egg and just give her a little to start with, then refrigerate the rest of it in a glass container with a lid for another day.

  3. Hi, I have a collie/whippet (more whippet) 10 week old puppy female can I feed her my own chicken or duck eggs so young?
    Thanks

  4. Dogwalker69

    Dorothy! great to hear from you!!! I am a keen egg lover and think that they are key to a dogs health. I feed my Tibetan mastiff 3 eggs every morning xx

  5. Mr Dogman

    I feed my dog 9 raw eggs every morning for the past 7 years and he is very healthy indeed. Although he has had 3 operations on his intestines and has 1 leg left. He is on the verge of a premature death. However eggs are silly, they are also good.

    • Erica Shellyon

      Sounds like a great dog. You should probably increase the amount of eggs though. One legged dogs should eat at least a dozen eggs.

  6. Deb

    Can I mix a raw egg in my 6prayers week old puppies wet food each morning? She has been constipaded?

    • Maybe every second morning

      • d3

        My dog waits for her egg as I come out of the coop. Shouldl I was t it before I give to her then or wash it first?

      • d3

        Found my glasses let’s try this again. My dog waits for her egg as I come out of the coop …do I give it to her then. Or wash it first?

  7. Suzanne Wall

    Is home cooked almost as good as raw?

  8. Suzanne Wall

    I need a cooked recipe to try for my two cocker spaniels, like amounts of each ingredient. They are both 25 lbs. and healthy but have been on a kibble plus some freeze- dried raw on top. I know they need a healthier diet. Thank you.

  9. Angel KH

    I have to weiner dogs weighing about 13-15 lbs. For breakfast they get half of a 1/4 c dry food, mixed with a whole egg(minus te shell). For supper they get half of a 1/4c dry food, mixed with green beans, peas & carrots with about a T of sweet potatoes. So, I should be giving them the whole egg shell and all at breakfast right? Are these 2 meals safe?

  10. I have a Bichon-Frisse and he has skin problems. He licks, or scratches or bites places as if he has an allergy. I can try raw eggs with his (Blue) Buffalo Kibble. But raw chicken with bone. I am afraid since he is a small dog. Also, his teeth are strong and I believe he could fragment the bone. I will try with beef or lamb.

    • Ellen Letson

      Dorothy, I can relate; My Cavalier King Charles Spaniel has these issues a well. I have tried many human grade kibble and nothing seems to work! She is currently on FreshPet raw food and frankly no better. My husband has wanted to give her raw eggs for some time and I was very reluctant but after so many medications and steroids rounds I am willing to try anything! I do hope feelings eggs help us both!

      • Kim

        Hi Dorothy,
        FreshPet is still a processed food ~ kind of like liver sausage with veggies, and in most cases some sort of carb. It isn’t a raw food even though it’s presented that way in stores. For the money you spend on Freshpet why not switch your dog to a commercially prepared raw diet. If you have access to Answers Pet food, that would be an excellent choice, especially with the addition of their frozen raw goats milk! The raw goats milk is full of probiotics and digestive enzymes as well as being a natural antihistamine. Vitamins and minerals abound too. Other good brands of raw food are Raw Bistro and Steve’s Real Food if you can’t get your hands on Answers. Check out Answer’s website http://www.answerspetfood.com for more info or call Jacqueline directly at their 800 number on the site. She is very knowledgable (read her bio on the website) and more than happy to discuss your pet’s issues with you. Good Luck! ~ you won’t be sorry ….ps eggs are a great idea too, but it’ll take more than eggs to get your Cav back on track!

    • I just read an article stating raw eggs bad.
      Scared me as I have been feeding my English Mastiff raw eggs for a treat.
      And mixing raw egg in the new pups brown rice and 12 grain bread with milk.
      I believe these people have it right so I will continue.
      I used to take my dogs for all the vaccines and feed the best dog food.
      They all died young got cancers has terrible hot spots.
      Then more articles came on line about vaccines causes immune deceases makes since and rashes cancers are immune loss deceases.
      Now I feed then all meat or peanut butter sandwiches , brown rice eggs and Hamburg, and the big meal with me is a big pot of pasta with diff vegis, meat, and eggs.
      Shiny coats no rashes and no more vaccines.
      We have been sold a bill of goods by the Corp. dog food makers. The corp. vets. And corp.drug companies and our own town laws. Because drug sales and trips to the vet. makes money for all including our criminal town fathers’

    • Hi Dorothy,
      I totally understand your concern with the raw chicken bones, but realize that dogs are completely able to ingest and digest raw bone. The fragments or splintering of bone that you are worried about are only an issue with cooked, smoked or dried bones. Raw is quite safe when it comes to bone consumption. Our canines have been on this diet since puppyhood because of allergies, yeast infections, hotspots and upset stomachs. All problems have gone away since their switch to raw! :)

    • Dorothy. I am not a vet, but one thing that continues to be true is that dogs have sensitivities or in-tolerances to chicken protein. It really isn’t an allergy per say. Blue Buffalo Basics or Wellness Simple solutions are a 1 portion limited ingredient diet. Try it for at least 8 weeks. Other wise, I recommend http://www.monicasegal.com She is really good! Best of luck

  11. Bonnie & Bentley

    Loved this article! I have heard mixed “reviews” on feeding raw eggs. I recently started giving my corgi raw eggs with his kibble.
    I feed Blue Buffalo, and usually mix in wet food with his dry (in the mornings) and i experimented with mixing an egg with his kibble a few weeks ago. He really likes it!
    He likes it enough that i’m considering subsituting the egg for his wet food, a can of his BB is about $2.50+ whereas i can get a carten of eggs for under $2.00

    • Eric

      How is his stool? Because I’m going to try an eggs instead of wet food myself.

  12. Destiny

    Hello,

    I have tried feeding my great dane raw, and after countless attempts she just either doesnt eat it, or when she does nothing ever agrees with her stomach. I hate switched back to kibble – Natures Logic. They have 16 flavors and its 100% natural – no added chemicals or anything.

    I tend to give her some fruits and veggies occasionally with her kibble and she does fine. Would giving eggs while she is fed kibble still be good for her? She will have a nice shiny coat right?

    • That’s a good choice for kibble – it’s one of only two that we would recommend because it doesn’t contain synthetic ingredients.

      Eggs are always a good addition! Give them to her raw if she’ll accept them and it will do more for her than just a shiny coat. Fresh foods are always preferable, so keep trying her on them.

      • Destiny

        Thank you. Any side effects I should keep an eye out for – good or bad?

        Also, i have been thinking about if she wont eat true raw, to try Natures Variety Raw – if that doesnt work, is their kibble any good?, or if their raw doesnt work stick with Natures Logic?

  13. Ariel Hayes

    I have a pit bull with really bad hips and he’s lost some weight will raw eggs help

  14. Isabeau

    I found this article very useful. Thank you for writing this article and providing this information.

    I have a research background and I would love to know where you found your information for your article.

    I know someone that fed their first dog the recommended raw eggs. With their second dog the breeder told them that raw eggs were a thing of the past. A commercial dog food was recommended which claimed to have done research to provide the dog with all the nutrition needed for a dog. However, the results were obvious. The first dog had a prettier and shinier coat than the second dog. The breeder’s advice for having a healthy and desirable coat did not work when it was compared to the tradition of feeding raw eggs. I would have believed the breeder’s advice was adequate if I had not been able to compare the two dogs.

  15. Melissa

    I have fed my Bullmastiffs a completely raw diet for over 15 yrs and they have all been extremely healthy(no toxic kibble in my house!) They have gotten raw eggs whole with shell all these years several times a week with no ill effects. My bitches have never blown coat from whelping puppies and the puppies are shiny and strong and never touch kibble all raw weaned and raised. I save the organic shells from the eggs we eat and use them ground for calcium for the pups meat meals without bone.

  16. sdeb

    My 11 yr old canish has liver, pancreas problem and often suffers from diarreah…is it safe to give her raw eggs?

      • maddy

        Not entirely correct unfortunately dogs naturally magazine – although 9 months late now it would be wise of you to respond to sdeb that egg yolks are high in fat and not recommended for dogs with severe pancreatitis (or other serious fat malabsorption issues) that require virtually no fat in the diet.

  17. This article really makes me happy. Completely agree with all the benefits!
    All my four dogs eat raw food. I give them raw eggs yokes 3 times a week. I do not give my dogs the egg whites, but use those later that week, making Pavlova or some other good stuff for our family. This is not just not for the avidin etc, but to take the advantage of having fresh egg whites in the fridge, I use a win-win opportunity here :)
    I also do use the dried egg shells, will add to the meat when needed, usually to replace the bones (when not enough place for bones in the fridge or I missed to shop) .
    All four dogs (Wheatens and Havanese) are doing great! As they all have fabulous hair and shiny white teeth, some of the friends who never thought of giving anything raw for their dogs are now asking for advise.

  18. DB

    My household goes through a lot of eggs and I boil them in bulk and use a tbsp of baking soda in the water to make them easier to peel. Using this method of boiling egg, is it still safe (shell included) to feed my dog as an occasional snack? Or should I boil a separate batch for my boy without the baking soda?

  19. bethany

    We raise and butcher our own rabbits for our freezer, as well as raise our own free-range chickens, and I’ve been feeding my boxer the raw organs from our butchered rabbits ever since we started. She also gets a raw egg mixed into her dry kibble everyday. She just had her first litter of boxer pups and they are now going off to their new homes, and her hair is falling out so badly she is almost bald in several areas! I was told its stress induced and from her hormones changing, but is there anything else I should be feeding her in the raw (or anything else) to help get her back on track or will her normal diet do the trick once she gets over the stress and hormone changes?

    • Girls will look a mess when they have puppies. Once her coat grows back in, she’ll be fine. Just make sure she is getting a very good diet while nursing as it can take a lot out of the girls.

    • laurie

      Just get rid of the kibble and feed her entirely raw. I’ve had my 5 yr. old beagle on a completly raw diet for 18 months, and she is doing great. There are all kinds of web sites with all kinds of info on raw feeding. I feed the “raw meaty bone” diet. She is perfectly capable of chewing and digesting any raw bone, and loves them. She also gets raw eggs 2-3 times a week and has had no adverse effects. I also dry yams, bananas, tomatoes and meat for her treats. She gets absolutley NO commercial food!!!

  20. Joseph

    I am going to start raw egg feeding for my Laptop Apso 1yr old and for my little puppy! I ‘ve heard it is safe for them both to also eat raw chicken legs and wings. Is this true! Raw chicken is safe for my little dog and for my puppy? Thx! Awesome Site!!

    • mikayla

      Yes, feeding your dog raw is the most natural and healthy form of feeding.

    • Philip Haughton

      Yes it’s perfectly safe and its a more natural food for dogs – dogs are descended from wolves and they share much the same DNA the digestive tract of a dog is almost identical to that the wolf. Wolves and hence dogs are carnivors and they never ate cereals until the dog and pet food industry began in the 1930′s. Dried Kibble and most canned / sausage dog food is mostly cereal based and what is meat is not necessarily good meat at all. In the 1930′s The Meat farming industry had a problem; they had a lot of cattle that was unfit for the human food chain because it was diseased, sick or contaminated in some way or had died before it reached the slaughterhouse. At the same time the Cereal farmers had surplus grain crops that had spoilt and gone rancid and were unfit for human consumption, the two industries combined their waste products and started to produce pet foods, to make it more palatable they add flavourings, preservatives and colourings, then they market the food with expensive advertising and claims of how good it is thus producing a convenience food for dogs which equates to feeding them something worse than feeding Macdonalds to your children every meal -It’s simply no good for your dog. So why do vets recommend it? Because they are getting huge profits out of selling it and are given bonuses for promoting it; and if the animal isn’t thriving you take him to the vet to get him treated again all at the benefit financially for the vet. Not all vets do promote processed pet foods – there is an increasing number of holistic veterinary practices promoting the raw or (BARF) diet as it is known. You will find a great deal of information about the BARF diet online; there are ways to make up your own BARF food for your dogs and there are frozen Pre-mixed complete raw foods available. It’s important to realise that your Dog needs more than just the meat; he also importantly requires the bones, heart, liver, kidney and other organs in his diet. Raw fruit and vegetables are also included in the BARF diet – the only cereal grain ever allowed in the diet is rice. Wolves in the wild eat forest fruits as a small part of their diet and they consume the contents of the gut of their prey (Deer, Bison, Caribou, Rabbit, Fish, Carrion etc) so fruit and vegetables are a natural part if the diet as is raw eggs. Dogs fed on the BARF diet are healthier more energetic have fewer allergies and illnesses and live longer. So long as they get to chew on bones and things like chicken wings poultry necks they have fewer dental problems as these are natural tooth brushes for wolves and dogs. Dogs fed on the raw diet also have better breath and less body odour, these issues are caused by cereals which the dog is unable to digest the only purpose of cereals is to bulk out the meal and make the dog feel full he gets little or no nutrition out of the cereal and instead gets allergies and illnesses. Hope this answers your question.

    • laurie

      My daughter’s corgi had a litter of 6 puppies and weaned them all on to raw food, chicken wings, thighs and carcasses. They had no problem eating the bones , and are all fat sassy pups . Raw is the only way to go for dogs & cats

  21. janice scott

    I have a 7 month old pom who goes with me every day to gather eggs and the only way she will come out from chasing chickens is to give her a egg and she plays with it until it breaks and then eats the whole egg. some times the egg last for 15 to 20 minutes.

  22. Stephanie

    One of my dogs has a bladder stone, so she gets a special homemade diet, and I had been scrambling the eggs for safety before. I like to make a large batch, so my question is, if I use raw instead of cooked eggs, should I just freeze instead of refrigerate the mix to keep the egg longer, or maybe just add egg as I serve it…? She’s a little dog, so I’m not sure she needs a whole egg everyday… The current mix uses six eggs that I scramble and mix with the rest so that she gets an even mix of everything. She already looks great from this diet, but if I can do better, I’d like to. Also, this all also applies to duck eggs, right? I have ducklings on the way and it seems I’ll be drowning in those soon. Thanks for any advice! :-)

  23. katelyn

    My 3 1/2 year old American Bulldog, Lab mix, Tank, has short white hair that gets everywhere. You always know where he’s been. I know that short hair dogs are more prone to shedding, but will raw eggs help with his coat to be healthier and result in less shedding? I already asked his vet if there was something at home that I could do, but she had no suggestions for me. I’ve already been putting a raw egg in his food once a day, a long with fresh minced garlic to keep fleas and ticks running the other way, and he loves it! So, if the eggs are the answer, I won’t have a problem feeding him eggs with his dry food.

    • Kristen

      Although your dog is loving the garlic, onion and garlic have toxins that dogs cannot digest properly. You might want to look more into it, but in summary it can shorter you dogs life!

      • Ronald

        Once again, the scare of garlic. Garlic is not the same as onion. No, we shouldn’t feed dogs onion. But garlic, given raw and in safe amounts is very benificial for dogs. I’ve had this confirmed both by a naturapathic vet and a NR whippet breeder. A very safe dose, for example, my two whippets who weigh 38lb, they each get 1/2 clove daily. We skip the odd day. Garlic is a regular part of their diet. Yes, too much garlic or cooked garlic can make a dog anemic. But in safe amounts is very good for our canines.

    • shubham

      look give him edible sulfur..it is a yellow color rock…make its powder and put half spoon of it in yogurt and give it to him..

      this thing is not so famous in your country but in countries like india,china..asian countries home remedies are well known…we are known for our culture and environment knowledge..

      and if you have any doubt about the idea..search on google… sulfur dogs

    • Heather Schultz

      I have an 11 month old American bulldog/Boxer mix and she too sheds like crazy. Do you think the eggs have been helping with Tank’s coat? I have had suggestions with giving Sasha a raw egg and she loves it. I was just wondering if you have seen any difference in the shedding since giving him the egg.

  24. bayo

    Do I feed my. South afrcan boerboel dogs soy milk? If yes what the safest way to make it for them.

  25. I’m wondering why the article suggests drying the egg shells and sprinkling over the food? I just drop the egg into a dish hard enough to crack the shell, and give the whole thing to my dogs. They love it! If a dog’s stomach can digest raw bones, they can digest an egg shell.

    It is good that the article mentions organic and free range chicken eggs.. (Though the way farms are allowed to use those terms can render the terms almost meaningless.)

    I’m in a position to own my own chickens, who were raised locally, so I know what goes into them, and trust what comes out. :-) If it’s at all possible to obtain locally grown eggs, it’s worth the effort for both humans and dogs.

  26. Ethan

    My dog is 9 months old and usualy takes his sweet time eating his meals. Sometimes he literally just wont eat, whatsoever. A friend of ours recommended dropping an egg on top of his dry food. As soon as we did that my dog went NUTS. He ate his entire bowl in about 30 seconds. He loves it! Is it a problem giving him an egg in both his meals daily?

  27. Brenda

    Will raw eggs help with my dogs, extremely dry skin???????????????

    • Ally

      A raw meat diet all together will likely help your dogs skin. Feed him raw meaty bones. A dog can eat any kind of chicken bone as long as it is raw and surrounded in meat, also pork, beef, lamb, turkey and others too. Fish can be fed whole raw or cooked. This is because the bones in fish do not really change when they are cooked. Fish and eggs are every good for your dogs skin. I feed my dog nothing but his raw meat diet, I came across it while looking up things to help my dogs very dry skin. He’s been eating this diet for about 2 months now and has so much energy compared to the dry kibble I was feeding him before. ( And he’s no pup )His skin also does not bother him now. I suggest you do some good research online and maybe try it out yourself. It’s the best decision I have made for my dog.

  28. Richard Tucker

    I have been feeding my Bull Mastiff approximately two eggs a day mixed with her lamb and rice food for about two weeks. This is the only way she will eat the lamb and rice food and she is getting a little older and i want her to have the protien. She is doing fine with it, loves the food when the egg is on it; however, I want to know if there are any long term health risks i need to be concerned about. I have not noticed any immediate effects thus far. Please advise.

    Rick Tucker

    • I would be a lot more concerned about the lamb and rice kibble than the eggs. If she doesn’t like the kibble but likes the real food, maybe she’s telling you something you should pay attention to?

  29. May

    I cook the eggs for my dog….is this bad?

  30. Lisa

    My Lab has skin problems and he is 10 yrs old. Will eggs benefit his skin? Currently I feed him Blue Buffalo Mature and Salmon/white fish by FreshPet Vital. Its kind of out of my budget to buy this all the time. (Disability) By adding raw egg mixture will this help or substitutE? Thanks

    • Philip Haughton

      Yes raw eggs are perfectly safe and its a more natural food for dogs – personally I would avoid feeding the Kibble, you can feed a complete raw natural diet for dogs for less than the cost of the processed un-natural and often expensive Kibble. Dogs are descended from wolves and they share much the same DNA the digestive tract of a dog is almost identical to that the wolf. Wolves and hence dogs are carnivors and they never ate cereals until the dog and pet food industry began in the 1920- 30′s. Dried Kibble and most canned / sausage dog food is mostly cereal based and what is meat is not necessarily good meat at all. In the 1920 -30′s the Meat farming industry had a big problem; they had a lot of cattle that was unfit for the human food chain because it was either diseased, sick or contaminated in some way or had died before it reached the slaughterhouse. At the same time the Cereal farmers had surplus grain crops that had spoilt and gone rancid and were unfit for human consumption, the two industries combined their waste products and found a way to sell it on – they started to produce pet foods, and to make it more palatable they add flavourings, preservatives and colourings, then they market the food with expensive advertising and claims of how good this brand of that is we are all suckers for advertising and so fall for it. What the pet food industry are producing is a convenience food for dogs which equates to feeding them something worse than feeding Macdonalds to your children every meal – It’s simply no good for your dog. So why do so many vets recommend it? Because they are getting huge profits out of selling it and they are given bonuses for promoting it; and if the animal isn’t thriving then you take him to the vet to get him treated – again all at the benefit financially for the vet. Not all vets do promote processed pet foods and there is an increasing number of holistic veterinary practices promoting the raw or (BARF) diet as it is known. You will find a great deal of information about the BARF diet online; there are ways to make up your own BARF food for your dogs and there are frozen Pre-mixed complete raw foods available. It’s important to realise that your Dog needs more than just the meat; he also importantly requires the bones, heart, liver, kidney and other organs in his diet. Raw fruit and vegetables are also included in the BARF diet – the only cereal grain ever allowed in the diet is rice. Wolves in the wild eat forest fruits as a small part of their diet and they consume the contents of the gut of their prey (Deer, Bison, Caribou, Rabbit, Fish, Carrion etc) so fruit and vegetables are a natural part if the diet as is raw eggs. Dogs fed on the BARF diet are healthier more energetic have fewer allergies and illnesses and live longer. So long as they get to chew on bones and things like chicken wings poultry necks they have fewer dental problems as these are natural tooth brushes for wolves and dogs. Dogs fed on the raw diet also have better breath and less body odour, these issues are caused by cereals which the dog is unable to digest the only purpose of cereals is to bulk out the meal and make the dog feel full he gets little or no nutrition out of the cereal and instead gets allergies and illnesses. Hope this answers your question.

  31. Shane Johnson

    Iv Fed My 9 year old a egg a day Since he was 3 months old. No one can Beleive He Is that old.. He dont belive it.

  32. Thank- you for posting this article. Every other day or two I would mix in with Iams dog food a raw egg sans shell for my best friend and lady German Shepherd Miura Eureka. I would try my best to get them from a local, so the eggs were not “altered” if you will. Not only did it give the dry kibble some moisture, it kept her healthy. Sadly, she has left me; yet I have to tell ya, those were the happiest 15 years of my life, so far. People usually say to me that fifteen years for a Shepherd is a long time. I personally eat three or four raw eggs a week, and not because I’m a foxx. =^.^=

  33. kris

    I have a pure bread Rare black sealed brindle
    boxer.

    She is so soft and so glossy I give her 4 eggs
    with the shell a week. I don’t give in to the dog food market I make my own.

    Fish oil is a must
    GREEN BEANS, RUN UNDER WATER FIRST.
    RICE,

    MAKE A ROUTINE ON SUNDAY AND MAKE
    YOUR LOVED ONES WEEKLY MEALS

    PLANNING.

    IT IS CHEEPER, THAN PET STORES.

    I COULD NOT BELIEVE THE COST TODAY.

    • Ruby

      Hi I read your comment and breed boxers. Half of mine are reverse brindle. The seal brindle is not rare. I can produce them everyday by breeding two reverse brindles together. The reason they are not COMMON is they are not a color that meets breed standard, so responsible breeders do not breed for seals. They can NOT be shown if the brindle is not visible at all. The “black” boxer is like the white in that regard. A responsible breeder does not produce either as a goal. I glad she is loved and well cared for, but her color is not rare… Peace n Blessings Ruby

      • Erica Christopher

        “Responsible” breeders actually don’t breed for looks, they breed for health. Are seal brindles any less healthy than other colors? What if both reverse brindle parents come from great and diverse genetics and their COI is low? Wish more breeder would concentrate less on looks and more on health and function.

        • Helen Lessley

          I get tired of breeders that continually focus on only allowing one or two colors in the breed because these meet a “standard” created by a few people. Not only is it boring (I wish there were brindle, blue, chocolate, and purple boxers, it would be more interesting), but it is unhealthy. When dogs are all bred to be the same color it reduces genetic variability and weakens the dog. Golden retrievers are a perfect example of this problem. All gold, all pretty, and the breed is plagued with health issues. Diverse coloration is part of health and function. But of course the conformation ring is proven to destroy breeds. Almost all of the breeds lose their original looks and purpose and become extreme, inbred, and unhealthy.

    • Can I get the recipe that you make for your dog? I have two Boston Terriers and they have dry skin. I know fleas do not help but I need something to make it better.
      Thx

      • Carolyn Bush

        Karen, I have a little Boston and she has a beautiful thick coat. I make my own dog food. She gets chicken in the morning and beef at night. Its a mix of ground meat, veggies, rice, steel oats, eggs, mushrooms, liver, gibblets and hearts, ground egg shells, flaxseed, and liquid. I cook like a meat loaf (can’t get into the raw yet). Put into 4 oz containers and freeze. She gets 4 oz. morning and 4 oz evening. Also give her a vitamin, and 1/2 tsp coconut oil. She loves yogurt (probiotic). She is 5 yrs and healthy. When your dogs immune system is strong the health of your dog will also be strong and less likely to get sick. I also started making my own flea and tick wipes and sprays (essential oils) so I can stay away from chemicals.
        Carolyn

  34. Michelle

    Our greyhound and 2 bully’s love a raw egg yolk daily in their kibble! We have not had any digestive upset and the disappointment of not having an egg in their dish is quite amusing! :)

  35. Steve

    We feed out 2 Siberian Huskies a Raw Diet anyway and they get a couple of raw eggs per week with the shell.
    It’s quite funny to watch them delicately carry them to the garden and break them open.
    Our boy doesn’t eat the shell but our girl does and then his.
    Perfectly safe and recommended.
    ~Steve

  36. Been feeding raw eggs to my Bully Boy Family for years. They love them, and have had no digestion problems at all. However… I do not generally feed the shells; unless I happen to score some home raised organic eggs, and I know for a fact that the shells have not been treated with anything.. Play time for the puppies.. I make hard boiled eggs, peel them, and roll them around on the floor. They go nuts chasing and playing with them. Hard boiled eggs don’t roll in a predictable way, and it keeps puppies entertained. This is one mess they really clean up after themselves.

    • Ruby

      Its more fun not to peel the hardboiled egg. You can crack them & if they need calcium they will eat the shell if not they will peel them… Quite entertaining both for us & the pups…

  37. My dogs love eggs! I feed an entirely raw diet to my four small dogs and they are super healthy. We never need to visit the vet, which suits the dogs just fine :)
    People have been confused about eggs for a while saying that eggs are good, egg whites are good, then egg yolks are bad, etc. Eggs are a great source of protein when fed whole. I simply drop the egg in front of each dog and they lap it up with relish.

    Pamela, crush the clean, dry shells and spread them out on a baking tray. You can cover the tray with baking paper if you want. Then just heat on 300F for 10 minutes and voila, you have your own home made calcium supplement. Store in a glass container.

    • Dogs Naturally

      They will dry out on their own – I just put the shells back in the carton and wait a few days before grinding.

      • Carolyn

        I do the same thing. When I make up a batch of dog food I put eggs in it and add the ground up shells from the previous batch. That way they have had a chance to dry out and be ground up.

  38. Pamela Tucker

    Good! Simon loves eggs! We get fresh eggs from a friend’s hens. They are so good I hate to share them!

    “Simply dry the shells out” what is the best way to do this? In the oven?

  39. Thanks, great article!
    I had heard conflincting opinions on the biotin issue, but after much research and considering that my dogs have gotten a raw egg every day for the past few years,and are fine, and that in the wild a dog would not separate the white from the yolk but would eat the egg whole:))).

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    [...] Originally Posted by dawnybabe Pig Ears… What's wrong with Pigs ears.. is it because they are made from the skin just like RawHide?? apple – what is wrong with Apple, I give mine apple every time I eat one i give them a few pieces, PLUS its in there Dog food. This Link below is from my Sister In Laws Vet Clinic she works at (its Holistic Clinic) it Tells you TOXIC Plants and foods for your pets. (some plants I didnt know but the foods yes) Lakewood Animal Hospital – Toxic House Plants I think its the apple seeds that are a no no not the actual apple itself. As for raw eggs, I think its ok, if your worried though maybe just the egg yolk would be better without the white. here is a link that talks about this. Feeding Your Dog Raw Eggs – Good Or Bad? | Dogs Naturally Magazine [...]

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